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canary population has guirre egyptian tripled vulture

The Canary Egyptian vulture (guirre) population has tripled
#1
Courtesy of Diario de Fuerteventura

The guirre (or Canary Egyptian vulture), one of the most dangerous threatened raptors in Europe, has tripled its population in the last two decades, in a recovery in which biologists consider decisive the result of the measures taken to protect it with the help of the European Life program.

The Biological Station of Doñana (CSIC) and the universities of Amsterdam, Balearic Islands, Lund (Sweden) and Las Palmas de Gran Canaria publish in the journal "Journal of Applied Ecology" the results of the measures implemented by the Life program between 2004 and 2008 to protect this bird, one of the most emblematic of the islands.

The study recalls that, in Fuerteventura and Lanzarote, the last two redoubts of this variety of Egyptian vulture, only 21 breeding pairs were counted in 1998. Two decades later, they are already 67.

"These are hopeful results for this bird, which until recently had rather gloomy prospects for the future", explains the first signatory of the article Jaume Adriá Badia, researcher attached to Balearic and Lund universities and the Doñana station.

The authors of the work remind that the guirre "went from being abundant in a good part of the Canary archipelago in the middle of the XX century to being restricted in a single population divided between Fuerteventura and Lanzarote in 1998", which led to the articulation of protection measures, supported as of 2004 by the European Union.

The Life program focused on the guirre focused on counteracting its two main causes of death: accidents with power lines and the ingestion of poisoned carrion.

To this end, corrective measures were taken on power lines to make them safer for birds and social awareness campaigns were undertaken to reduce the use of poisons.

Since then, indicate the results of this work, there have been few deaths due to the collision and coupling in power lines (there has been two cases between 1998 and 2006 to none between 2007 and 2017) and mortality from poisonings has decreased drastic (has dropped from 21 cases to only three).

"This study shows that environmental education and the awareness of the population can be vital to combat the current biodiversity crisis, and conservation measures have resulted in an increase in survival, especially in the adult fraction of the population. population, which is precisely the most determining parameter when it comes to guaranteeing the viability of these populations, "adds another of the authors Ana Sanz Aguilar, a researcher at the Mediterranean Institute of Advanced Studies (University of the Balearic Islands-CSIC).

"Comprehensive" monitoring for 20 years

One of the novelties of this study has been the use of a statistical method that includes parameters that are usually not taken into account, such as the loss of rings.

"We have been carrying out intensive and exhaustive monitoring of this population in Fuerteventura for more than 20 years, and the collection of detailed long-term individual monitoring data has allowed us to apply more complex statistical analyses, which in turn have generated results that allow us to better understand the ecology and demography of this and other long-lived species ", says the director of the guirre monitoring project, José Antonio Donázar, from the Doñana Biological Station (CSIC).

The work also highlights the importance of carrying out long-term monitoring of conservation measures.

Currently, due to their cost, these follow-ups are difficult to maintain. "However, in this case, a monitoring campaign of more than 20 years has allowed us to evaluate the efficiency of a Life project beyond its four years of implementation, and such monitoring and evaluation, if done regularly, would allow us to understand which conservation measures have good results and which ones do not, "adds Sanz Aguilar.


EDIT: Correction of GoogleTranslate. Thanks everyone.
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#2
(20-02-2019, 01:41 PM)Sam Wrote: The guirre (or Canary Egyptian vulture), one of the most dangerous raptors in Europe

"Dangerous"???

If you are dead, yes.  Otherwise, I don't see how.
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#3
(21-02-2019, 09:12 AM)hairybiker Wrote:
(20-02-2019, 01:41 PM)Sam Wrote: The guirre (or Canary Egyptian vulture), one of the most dangerous raptors in Europe

"Dangerous"???

If you are dead, yes.  Otherwise, I don't see how.

...are dead or a chipmunk?  Squirrel Squirrel
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#4
I think bad translation. Most at threat, not dangerous.
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#5
'Diario' used the word amenazadas which can be translated as threatened.
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#6
The Cabildo de Fuerteventura, through the Ministry of the Environment, has proceeded today, Monday, June 1, to release a female 40H guirre who was picked up by Environment agents in Cofete, on April 26 , after receiving notice from a citizen. At the time of its collection, the animal presented symptoms of poisoning by poisons.

After receiving the pertinent veterinary attention at the Oasis Wildlife, a centre that collaborates with the Cabildo through an agreement for the care and maintenance of injured wildlife species, this 40H breeding female is released following the protocol established by the General Directorate of Fight against Climate Change, based on its powers and in coordination with the Fuerteventura Council.

Before proceeding to release the animal, a GPS / GSM transmitter was implanted by the technical monitoring staff of the Doñana-CSIC Biological Station, which will allow an exhaustive monitoring of the movements and behaviour of the animal after its release and intervene quickly in the event of an unforeseen event.

The Minister of the Environment, Marlene Figueroa, shows her gratitude to the citizens who gave the warning on April 26, “because thanks to them, a prompt intervention was made, ensuring that the animal survived and that today it can be released and can continue to fulfil its role as a breeding female of one of the most emblematic species on the Island and currently endangered, the Majorero Guirre (Neophron percnopeturs majorensis) ”.

Likewise, from the Environment area, citizens are reminded that when such findings are found, they should immediately inform 112, they should not pick up the animal or administer food or drink. Neither is it convenient to manipulate the environment, since it will be the personnel of the Environment who are in charge of providing the necessary care and transferring it to the centre where it can receive the care required for its recovery.

Courtesy of www.cabildofuer.es.


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#7
(03-06-2020, 02:32 PM)Sam Wrote: The Cabildo de Fuerteventura, through the Ministry of the Environment, has proceeded today, Monday, June 1, to release a female 40H guirre who was picked up by Environment agents in Cofete, on April 26 , after receiving notice from a citizen. At the time of its collection, the animal presented symptoms of poisoning by poisons.

After receiving the pertinent veterinary attention at the Oasis Wildlife, a centre that collaborates with the Cabildo through an agreement for the care and maintenance of injured wildlife species, this 40H breeding female is released following the protocol established by the General Directorate of Fight against Climate Change, based on its powers and in coordination with the Fuerteventura Council.

Before proceeding to release the animal, a GPS / GSM transmitter was implanted by the technical monitoring staff of the Doñana-CSIC Biological Station, which will allow an exhaustive monitoring of the movements and behaviour of the animal after its release and intervene quickly in the event of an unforeseen event.

The Minister of the Environment, Marlene Figueroa, shows her gratitude to the citizens who gave the warning on April 26, “because thanks to them, a prompt intervention was made, ensuring that the animal survived and that today it can be released and can continue to fulfil its role as a breeding female of one of the most emblematic species on the Island and currently endangered, the Majorero Guirre (Neophron percnopeturs majorensis) ”.

Likewise, from the Environment area, citizens are reminded that when such findings are found, they should immediately inform 112, they should not pick up the animal or administer food or drink. Neither is it convenient to manipulate the environment, since it will be the personnel of the Environment who are in charge of providing the necessary care and transferring it to the centre where it can receive the care required for its recovery.

Courtesy of www.cabildofuer.es.

What is 40H Sam, the bird's ring number? I can't find the article to check.
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#8
(03-06-2020, 08:49 PM)milestone11 Wrote: What is 40H Sam, the bird's ring number? I can't find the article to check.

Honesty, no idea. Could "H" be some kind of size/weight/time measuring unit?

http://www.cabildofuer.es/cabildo/el-cab...uperacion/
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#9
(04-06-2020, 05:57 AM)Sam Wrote:
(03-06-2020, 08:49 PM)milestone11 Wrote: What is 40H Sam, the bird's ring number? I can't find the article to check.

Honesty, no idea. Could "H" be some kind of size/weight/time measuring unit?

http://www.cabildofuer.es/cabildo/el-cab...uperacion/

Thanks Sam. After I wrote the post, I did a google search on the photo and found the article. I've no idea to what the 40H refers.
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